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Finally I accidentally found a recruiting company who thinks like me! (at least on their web site)

Check out their manifesto web page https://triplebyte.com/manifesto

I can subscribe under each paragraph! In fact every it is exactly what I'm saying to my wife every time I'm coming back from some interview. 

Just in case if they will disappeared at some moment, it happens on Internet, I want to copy all their statements here



MANIFESTO

Here are ten things that we believe about Triplebyte. These beliefs motivate our approach towards hiring and interviewing.

Programmer interviews are broken.

Candidates deserve a consistent experience and consistent evaluation. A company can't meaningfully evaluate candidates if it treats each one differently.

Hiring processes need to be standardized.

Whiteboard coding and algorithm questions aren't good predictors of how effective someone will be at writing real code. Technical hiring processes harm both excellent candidates who don't interview well and companies trying to hire good programmers.

Hiring decisions should be objective.

Hiring decisions should be made using a clear scoring system, not gut feelings. Humans are good at gathering information, but bad at ignoring bias. We unconsciously pattern match. This harms candidates who don't match our expectations.

Hiring processes should focus on strengths, not weaknesses.

The hiring process should be focused on discovering strengths, not uncovering weaknesses. Everybody has weaknesses. What matters is a candidate's strengths, and how quickly they can learn new things.

Candidates should know what to expect.

Candidates should be told exactly what to expect in an interview, and be allowed to prepare in advance. A comfortable interview is more likely to lead to a better hiring decision.

Candidates deserve feedback.

Candidates should be given clear, truthful feedback on how they did during the interview so they know how they can improve. Companies should invest time in providing this.

Credentials aren't everything.

Whiteboard coding and algorithm questions aren't good predictors of how effective someone will be at writing real code. Technical hiring processes harm both excellent candidates who don't interview well and companies trying to hire good programmers.

Hiring should constantly be iterated on and improved.

The hiring process should be treated like a software product, constantly iterated on using data, and improved over time. The software industry needs to experiment more with hiring processes and figure out what really works.

Compensation statistics should be public.

Candidates are at a fundamental disadvantage in salary and equity negotiations. They always know less than the hiring manager. This is unfair.

Recruiting should not be a core competency for companies.

Just as companies now outsource server management to AWS, they should be able to outsource technical hiring. The flaw with current external recruiting firms is they don't reliably deliver enough good candidates to build trust with companies.


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